Public Art

Public Art that celebrates history and inspires a sense of place. 

South Eveleigh enjoys a fascinating history. As well as being home to the Eveleigh Railway Workshops – the birthplace of Australia’s national rail network - the site has an important Indigenous legacy.

The wider contemporary public art program at South Eveleigh, facilitated by Mirvac and curated by Carriageworks and consortium partners AMP Capital, Sunsuper and Centuria Property Funds, has focused on building a public art program at the new community precinct including sculptural and botanical interventions, landmarks and meeting places created by a number of local artists.  

Public art works that form part of the wider South Eveleigh precinct include a site-specific artwork by Jonathan Jones located in the lobby of the Axle Building. Untitled (red gum slabs) also responds to South Eveleigh’s rail history, proximity to the railway network, as well as its local and state Indigenous heritage. The old red gum slabs used in this artwork were originally harvested in the Koondrook/Barham region on the Murray River, some over 100 years ago. Visual artist Nell has created two works for the precinct, Eveleigh Treehouse created in collaboration with Cave Urban, consisting of a series of interconnected pods that capture the essence of what adults remember tree houses to be, a place for imagination, observation and retreat; and Happy Rain, a large-scale smiling cloud created from LED lighting attached to the exterior of Yerrabingin House.

Pop Up Art

107 Projects Collaboration 

Our collaboration with 107 Projects to create a temporary public artwork series reflects our joint commitment to support emergent artists.  Artists Beth Radford and Nadeena Dixon have showcased how creative industries can engage with the community to create positive connections and social change.

107 Projects is a local social enterprise organisation with a philosophy and mission to empower communities by encouraging people to live creatively.

Hear more from the team at 107 Projects and the artists involved.

 


Permanent Art

Eveleigh Tree House by Nell

In 2018, Sydney-based artist Nell was invited by Mirvac to reimagine a tree house in adult form, wrapped around and within the trees on Eveleigh Green.

Situated outside Yerrabingin House at South Eveleigh, the Eveleigh Tree House encourages inter-generational play whilst promoting cultural connectivity, enhancing the everyday experience of the precinct.

As an artist, Nell has a wide-ranging of practices traversing installation, sculpture, video, painting and performance, the Eveleigh Tree House captures the essence of imagination, observation and retreat from the world.

Happy Rain by Nell

Happy Rain, Nell’s second public art work at South Eveleigh, will take the form of a large-scale smiling cloud created from LED lighting attached to the exterior of Yerrabingin House (Building 3) at South Eveleigh.

Nell explains, ‘This simple and universally recognisable imagery invites viewers to reflect on the relationship between weather, environment and mood, as well as the constancy of the natural world within and around our built environments. They reference that which has been eternal to this place – the weather and natural environment, the continuous elements that link Eveleigh of the future with the land of its past.’

Interchange Pavilion by Chris Fox

Interchange Pavilion, by artist Chris Fox, draws inspiration from the precinct’s rail history combining over 250 metres of stainless steel ground rails, 15 tonnes of robotically moulded glass reinforced concrete and 1400 pieces of router cut hardwood. This unique material palette is supported by a 14 tonne structure made up of over 1650 pieces of digitally fabricated aluminium to create a 350 square-metre public art installation.

The artwork is inspired by the iconic geometries of the meeting point between two train tracks. It began with the rail tracks of the area around Redfern Station, Carriageworks and The Locomotive Workshops, where Chris noticed the distinctive switch geometry: in particular a point where the rail lines diverge off into many different tracks. The switch became a way to follow all these different stories, routes and paths that have occurred on this site. The artwork is also an opportunity for visitors to reflect on these histories but also to come together before diverging into their own future journeys.

Lobby Art by Jonathan Jones

Located in the Lobby of Axle, Jonathan Jones’ Untitled (red gum slabs) is a site-specific artwork created in response to South Eveleigh’s rail history, proximity to the railway network, and both local and state Indigenous heritage. The old red gum slabs used in this artwork were originally harvested in the Koondrook/Barham region on the Murray River, some over 100 years ago.

The New South Wales timber industry in this region, like in many other areas, supplied the railway sleepers used throughout the State. The timber and railway industries have historically employed Indigenous people, with the railway providing the physical means for many to come to Sydney, after the Freedom of Movement Act, in search of a better life. In this way the railway network has been an important network for many Indigenous people, connecting the city and the country. The layout of the slabs reflects the railway lines and their natural shapes talk to the internal architectural treatment of the building, reminding viewers of the site’s past and future.